Tag Archives: word history

How the oceans got their names

Here is some interesting background to how the oceans got their names. Visit my websites via the links at the top of this page. Advertisements

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Words associated with salt

Here is a really interesting piece about words associated with salt. Visit my websites via the links at the top of this page.

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Some word histories

Time for some word history: Loggerhead Dope Draw a line in the sand Visit my websites via the links at the top of this page.

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Hoity-toity and gibberish

Yes, I know it is an odd combination, but I just happened to come upon these two posts: Hoity-toity Gibberish Visit my websites via the links at the top of this page.

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Some old phrases

And now, for this in between time of year, some background to some old phrases: Not my pigeon Salt of the earth Crocodile tears Visit my websites via the links at the top of this page.

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Baffle, culprit, and bankrupt

We’ve got a collection of word origins today: baffle culprit bankrupt Visit my websites via the links at the top of this page.

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Some old phrases

We’ve got a collection of well known sayings today: Pig in a poke Touch wood/knock on wood Old besom Safe as houses Spin a yarn Visit my websites via the links at the top of this page.

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Scrimshaw and seersucker

It is time we had some word history. This time there are some classic muddles: Scrimshaw. Seersucker. Derring-do. Donkey’s years. Visit my websites via the links at the top of this page.

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Why do we get stir crazy?

Find out some background to this old expression here. Visit my websites via the links at the top of this page.

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Why do the chickens come home to roost?

No, it isn’t the follow up to the chicken crossing the road, but it is a phrase that has been around for a long time. In fact, in seems we have Chaucer to thank for this one. Find out more … Continue reading

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