Why do we need grammar?

Editing_and_Proofreading Blog_312Grammar has had a rough ride over the years. Like many other things, it has gone in & out of fashion. This post tracks the fall and rise of grammar.

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Classic book design

Editing_and_proofreading_blog_103If you are thinking about the design of your book, here is a useful guide to classic ideas.

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Why do indie publishers need book fairs?

Editing_and_proofreading_blog_88If you are an indie publisher & are wondering about the relevance of book fairs, you may find this interesting.

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Improve the discoverability of your book

Editing_and_proofreading_blog_7Here are some useful tips about improving your discoverability. It is one area where a little thought can make an enormous difference to the success of your book.

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Shakespeare as an inventor of words

Editing_and_Proofreading Blog_320From time to time, we hear about words invented by Shakespeare. I’ve always thought this is a little odd.

Some friends of mine invented a new word a couple of years ago. They were messing around, & one of them accidentally said “interwebulator” when referring to the internet. The word has caught on, and quite a few of us now refer to looking things up on the interwebulator in our everyday conversations. In context, the made up word is so close to a more usual one that most of us don’t need to ask what it means. Only once has anyone ever said anything. He told me he didn’t think he had an interwebulator, but he adopted the word himself as soon as the penny dropped.

If I started to use a random sequence of letters, say “queadet” for the internet, it might take a while for anyone else to work out what I meant.

A playwrite is trying to get the story over to the audience. In live theatre, there is no opportunity for rewinding to check what has just been said. Making up a completely new word isn’t likely to help people to understand what is going on.

Find out more about this myth here.

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Making description work

Editing_and_Proofreading Blog_324Getting description right is an important aspect of fiction writing.

When it works, the story is alive in the reader’s mind without them noticing the effort they make.

When it doesn’t, your readers feel that they are plodding through long dull passages. They might even skip a chunk, or even give up.

Here are 5 ways to get descriptions right.

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Getting the right attitude

Editing_and_Proofreading Blog_303I’ve found a post titled “Why writers self-destruct“. It then goes on to give 5 ways to thrive instead.

Actually, it is a pretty good reminder about positive mental attitude in all sorts of situations.

. It comes down to a short list of short sentences:

  • Believe in yourself.
  • Try hard.
  • Get on with it.
  • Don’t get carried away with yourself.

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